NC State's Land Grant

NC State's Land Grant

1860s

  • 7/2/1862 Morrill Act becomes law

    The Morrill Act becomes law, providing national funding to establish a land-grant college in each state. In North Carolina, this funding first went to the University of North Carolina, but in 1887, the state legislature established the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (now NC State) as the state's land-grant institution.

1870s

  • 1872 Call for an agricultural school

    Leonidas Polk calls for the establishment of an agricultural school during a speech made at the NC State Fair.

  • 3/20/1875 Land scrip endowment restored

    An original land scrip endowment to the University of North Carolina as part of the Morrill Act (lost during the Reconstruction period) is restored. On paper, this creates a College of Agriculture and a College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts at the University of North Carolina.

1880s

  • 5/1884 Watauga Club meets

    The Watauga Club met for the first time. The club was formed by progressive-minded young men who were investigating way to strengthen all aspects of North Carolina, including creation of an industrial school.

  • 1885 Colleges still not created at UNC

    Colleges to provide agricultural education still have not been created at the University of North Carolina (an obligation upon receiving land-grant funding), and exist only in theory in the university's course catalogs.

  • 1/1885-2/1885 Watauga Club lobbies state legislature

    The Watauga Club successfully lobbies the North Carolina state legislature, with the sponsorship of Leazar Dixon, to pass a bill for an industrial school separate from the University of North Carolina's land scrip. The legislation doesn't mandate the school, however, and doesn't provide sufficient funding.

  • 2/10/1886 More calls for agricultural school

    Leonidas Polk continues to call for an agricultural school in the first published issue of the Progressive Farmer.

  • 4/21/1886 North Carolina Board of Agriculture accepts bid

    The North Carolina Board of Agriculture accepts a bid to locate an industrial school in Raleigh.

  • 1/1887-2/1887 Continued call for agricultural and industrial school

    Farmers' organizations in the state of North Carolina, along with the Watauga Club and Colonel Leonidas Polk, successfully lobby the North Carolina state legislature to add an agriculture school to the proposed industrial school in Raleigh. This new school would not be affiliated with the University of North Carolina, and would thus be able to acquire and use the land scrip funds being received (but not used by) the University of North Carolina.

  • 3/1/1887 Land scrip funds transferred to new Raleigh college, which became NC State

    University of North Carolina President Battle unsuccessfully opposes the transfer of the land scrip funds from UNC to the proposed agricultural school in Raleigh; a bill is passed on this date to transfer the funds.

  • 3/2/1887 Funding for Agricultural Experiment Station

    Under the Hatch Act, the federal government provided $15,000 to each state for agricultural experiment stations.

  • 3/3/1887 North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts established

    The North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts is established using a combination of the scrip funds reallocated from the University of North Carolina and funds from the Hatch Act of 1886, which had established the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station.

  • 3/7/1887 Legislation enacted creating the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts

    Charles Dabney pens the legislation to create the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. March 7 is still celebrated annually as Founders Day.

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  • 4/22/1887 Board of Trustees meets for the first time
  • 10/3/1889 First classes held

    The first classes are held at the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (the original name of NC State University). Fifty-two students, at the minimum age of 14, attend. Tuition was $20 a session. Students could select from two basic curricula: agriculture and mechanics.

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  • 12/9/1889 Agricultural Experiment Station transferred

    The Agricultural Experiment Station is transferred from the North Carolina Department of Agriculture to the North Carolina College of Agricultural and Mechanic Arts.

1890s

  • 1891 North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College established

    In order to comply with the Second Morrill Act and yet prevent admission of African Americans to the North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, the North Carolina state government creates the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College in Greensboro.

  • 6/20/1893 First commencement

    Nineteen students receive degrees during the first commencement ceremony held at A&M College.

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1990s

  • 1991 Campus Child Care Center opens